News

Judaism and Christianity: Next Moosnick Lecture Series

 Lexington, Ky., Feb. 6, 2013 – Author, professor and Rabbi Dr. Michael J. Cook discusses Jesus, Jusdaism and the Gospels, as well as co-existence vs. anti-Semitism in the relationship between Judaism and Christianity in a pair of lectures Feb. 17 and 18.

The lectures are part of the Franklin B. Moosnick Lectureship in Judaic Studies, sponsored by the Moosnick Endowment. Transylvania University, Lexington Theological Seminary, Ohavay Zion Synagogue, and Temple Adapt Israel present Cook’s lectures. Both lectures are free and open to the public.

Cook is the Sol & Arlene Bronstein Professor of Judeo-Christian Studies at Hebrew Union College-Jewish Institute of Religion in Cincinnati. He is the only rabbi in North America with a full-professorial chair in New Testament, and he serves on many advisory boards in Jewish-Christian relations.

Cook will present the first lecture, “Gospel Dynamics: When the Jewish Jesus Isn’t Enough,” Sunday, Feb. 17, at 7 p.m. in the Carrick Theatre on the Transylvania University campus. The second lecture, “Judaism, Christianity, and the Crucifixion: Coexistence vs. Anti-Semitism on Parchment” is Feb. 18 at 7 p.m. at Ohavay Zion Synagogue.

Cook has written about the evolving Jewish views of Jesus and Paul, studies on the various Gospels and on a wide spectrum of specialized subjects including the trial of Jesus, images of Judaism in Christian Art, the history of anti-Semitism, and the role of Passover in modern Christianity.

In 2003, he was one of seven scholars internationally selected by the Catholic Bishops to assess the accuracy of the advance script of Mel Gibson’s Passion of the Christ.

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Lexington Theological Seminary is an accredited graduate theological institution of the Christian Church (Disciples of Christ).  Consistent with the Disciples’ historic commitment to Christian unity, the Seminary is intentionally ecumenical with students, faculty, staff and trustees of various denominations. The Seminary has been preparing leaders for the church since 1865. For more information, visit www.lextheo.edu.

Spring Lay School of Theology – April 6,13, 20 & 27

Creation or Commodity?  Biblical Perspectives on Today’s Environmental Issuesrichard weis 300x222 Spring Lay School of Theology   April 6,13, 20 & 27
Led by Dr. Richard Weis, Vice President for Academic Affairs, Dean and Professor of Hebrew Bible

Course Concepts:

In contemporary American society a powerful way to think about the environment is as a series of commodities for human consumption.  The Bible, especially the Old Testament, offers equally powerful alternative views that have the capacity to help us see today’s problems with fresh eyes.  For example, one perspective sees nature and society as a single, interdependent web on which humans depend and for which they are responsible.  This course will nurture your ability to use the scriptures of the Old Testament to bring fresh perspectives and values to current environmental issues.

 

BROCHURE – click here to view or print off the Spring Lay School of Theology


Register



pixel Spring Lay School of Theology   April 6,13, 20 & 27

New Year, New Format for Doctor of Ministry Program

Lexington, Ky., Feb. 4, 2013 – The Doctor of Ministry program at Lexington Theological Seminary returns this year in a flexible, cohort-based model with a mostly online delivery system to meet the needs of those working in ministry today.

The Doctor of Ministry program at LTS is designed to equip pastors to transform congregations for effective ministry in the 21st century.

“Our mission is to prepare faithful leaders for the church of Jesus Christ, and as such we serve as a resource to those who wish to further their theological understanding as well as their preparedness to serve congregations in effective, innovative ways,” said LTS President Dr. Charisse L. Gillett. “We are pleased to be able to offer this program in a way that will allow access to a wider range of students who are unable to leave their current ministries and pursue a terminal degree.”

“The church needs leaders who can help it articulate the Gospel and nurture faith communities in ways that are culturally relevant in the 21st century,” said Dr. Richard Weis, LTS Vice-President and Dean of Academic Affairs. “Our new D.Min. curriculum will engage students in an on-going community of peers who together acquire the knowledge and hone the skills needed for that kind of leadership.”

The focus of the program includes:

  • approaches to interpreting contemporary cultural contexts;
  • integrating advanced work in the classical theological disciplines with the critical interpretation of culture in service to the church’s articulation of the gospel;
  • approaches for re-imagining organizations and institutional practices that are informed by the critical interpretation of cultures; and
  • approaches to leading organizations through adaptive change, especially those relevant to empowering congregations.

The 30-hour program includes a mix of interactive online courses, on-campus, intensive courses offered over a period of a week at a time, and a final research project in the student’s ministry context, arranged on a schedule shaped to fit the pastoral life.

For more about the program, including an overview of courses, tuition structure, admissions information and to apply, please visit: http://www.lextheo.edu/dmin/

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Lexington Theological Seminary is an accredited graduate theological institution of the Christian Church (Disciples of Christ).  Consistent with the Disciples’ historic commitment to Christian unity, the Seminary is intentionally ecumenical with students, faculty, staff and trustees of various denominations. The Seminary has been preparing leaders for the church since 1865. For more information, visit www.lextheo.edu.

January intensives sermon series

The inspired — and inspiring — words of Lexington Theological Seminary faculty and administrators are available to watch and share on the Seminary’s YouTube channel at http://www.youtube.com/LexTheoSeminary. In the January intensives sermon series we hear from:

Dr. Charisse Gillett, Dr. Wes Allen, Dr. Richard Weis, Dr. Barbara Blodgett and Dr. Jerry Sumney.

 

 

 

Strategic Outline

See our strategic outline here:
http://www.lextheo.edu/strategic-outline/

Rev. Dr. Barbara Blodgett to be installed

b.blodgett.2.080137 sm Rev. Dr. Barbara Blodgett to be installedThe Rev. Dr. Barbara J. Blodgett will be installed Saturday, Jan. 19, as the Donald and Lillian Nunnelly Assistant Professor of Pastoral Leadership.

The service begins at noon in the Sanders Chapel on campus.  Those attending are welcome to stay for lunch in Fellowship Hall afterwards.

Faculty, staff, trustees, and retired faculty and staff should arrive early so that they may join the academic procession.

Dr. Blodgett will deliver an installation address titled “On Not Going It Alone: Building Community in the Congregations of the Future.”

Dr. Blodgett joined the Seminary faculty in 2012. A Ph.D. graduate of Yale University, Department of Religious Studies, Ethics Program, Dr. Blodgett was most recently a lecturer in the SAGES Program at Case Western University. Dr. Blodgett also served as director of supervised ministries at Yale Divinity School, where she earned a Master of Divinity degree. Dr. Blodgett recently served as minister for vocation and formation in the national setting of the United Church of Christ and served as associate pastor at First Congregational Church (UCC) in Amherst, Mass.  Her teaching experience also includes roles at Yale University Graduate School, Mount Holyoke College and Yale College. Dr. Blodgett is a respected author of three books and numerous publications on the subjects of pastoral ethics, worship practices, field education and other areas pertinent to ministry.

The Donald and Lillian Nunnelly Chair in the Practice of Ministry was established in 2003 with a $1.2 million anonymous gift in honor of the Nunnellys, LTS graduates who have served in various leadership roles on the regional and general levels in the Christian Church (Disciples of Christ).

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Lexington Theological Seminary is an accredited graduate theological institution of the Christian Church (Disciples of Christ).  Consistent with the Disciples’ historic commitment to Christian unity, the Seminary is intentionally ecumenical with students, faculty, staff and trustees of various denominations. The Seminary has been preparing leaders for the church since 1865. For more information, visit www.lextheo.edu.

 

Seminary, Center for Faith & Giving Offer Program

LTS Logo 300x100 Seminary, Center for Faith & Giving Offer Program

Logowithvison 300x231 Seminary, Center for Faith & Giving Offer Program

 

 

 

 

 

 

Lexington, Ky., Jan. 9, 2013 – Lexington Theological Seminary and the Center for Faith and Giving are partnering to offer a certification program that advances a comprehensive understanding of stewardship for those preparing for ministry as well as those who serve congregations in the areas of stewardship, personal/congregational finance and best practices for organizations and congregations.

“It’s not just about money,” said Bruce Barkhauer, Minister for Faith and Giving for the Christian Church (Disciples of Christ). “The vision of the Center for Faith and Giving is to create a culture of generosity across the life of the church.  To that end, our mission is to educate, equip, encourage and inspire leaders to teach and preach stewardship as a spiritual discipline that encompasses the entirety of life.  The care for the earth, the care for self, the observance of the Sabbath, the care for the Gospel and the faithful management of our resources comprise a comprehensive understanding of stewardship.”

“Our goal is to enable those seeking substantive continuing education to grow and mature in their ministry,” said LTS President Dr. Charisse L. Gillett.  “We look forward to working with the Center in this regard.”

The partnership with LTS enables the Center and the Seminary to deliver relevant and transformative learning experiences that can influence attitudes and practices about generosity, preparing them for resource mission and ministry and to enhance the lifestyle of individuals and communities.

Completion of the series of three classes – all taught online – qualifies a student to be certified by the Center for Faith and Giving as a part of its teaching Academy to serve as a resource for the church.  It may also meet specific requirements for some Regional bodies of the Christian Church (Disciples of Christ) for those seeking ordination via the apprentice track for ordination.

The first class, which is a prerequisite to the other two courses, focuses on Biblical and Theological understandings of stewardship to create a foundation for understanding the nature of God’s abundance as cultural norm.  This perspective enables individuals and organizations to move from the fear of scarcity to the freedom of faith.  The holistic understanding of stewardship allows us to move the conversation away from stewardship being solely about money.

Registration is open through Jan. 28, and classes begin Feb. 4 via the online learning community of LTS. Class size is limited to 15 people. Register online at http://www.lextheo.edu/ministry-life-choices-initiative-2/ . The cost is $99, plus the cost of books.  The active class time lasts for four weeks, with two additional weeks to complete a final project that will demonstrate that the student has mastered the material presented. The course is open to both clergy and laity.  This course is taught by Rev. Bruce Barkhauer, Director of the Center for Faith and Giving, Rev. Dr. Richard Lowery, and Rev. Dr. Ronald Allen – all of whom appear via video lecture.

The second and third courses in the series will focus on congregational best practices, and personal and congregational finance.

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Lexington Theological Seminary is an accredited graduate theological institution of the Christian Church (Disciples of Christ).  Consistent with the Disciples’ historic commitment to Christian unity, the Seminary is intentionally ecumenical with students, faculty, staff and trustees of various denominations. The Seminary has been preparing leaders for the church since 1865. For more information, visit www.lextheo.edu.

The Center for Faith and Giving exists to create a culture of generosity across the life of the whole church. Our Mission is to encourage and promote the understanding of stewardship as a faith discipline and life practice in response to a generous God. www.centerforfaithandgiving.org

 

Seminary in action

Looking back at 2012: Our students talk about the impact LTS is making in their ministries.

Seminary Saturdays

Role of Theological Schools in Sustaining Ministry

Lexington, Ky., Sept. 27, 2012 – Seminaries can play an important role in ministry and sustaining ministers long after graduation.

A conference of the Council on Theological Schools (CTS) focused on the role of such schools in the identification, recruitment and nurture of students to help ensure successful ministry for the long term.  Lexington Theological Seminary President Dr. Charisse L. Gillett and the Rev. Richard Spleth, Regional Minister of the Christian Church in Indiana, coordinated the conference Sept. 13-15 in Indianapolis.

“Our purpose was to begin a substantive dialogue within the Council on what changes, if any, are needed in seminary education to prepare students for effective leadership and ministry in a 21st century church context,” Dr. Gillett said.

“I am encouraged by the willingness of participants to consider changes in seminary curricula and experiential opportunities that may be needed to better train, equip and nurture future generations of pastoral leaders. Success will require perseverance and creativity,” said Jim Hamlett, President of the Pension Fund of the Christian Church (Disciples of Christ).

“We recognized that this is a whole church challenge,” said Spleth. “This will require congregations and regions to work with the seminaries to both identify good candidates for ministry and, most importantly, provide a network of nurture in the first five years of ministry following ordination.”

Keynote speakers were Daniel O. Aleshire, Executive Director of The Association of Theological Schools in the United States and Canada; Matthew Bloom, Associate Professor of Management at the University of Notre Dame Mendoza College of Business and lead researcher in a Lilly Endowment-funded Flourishing in Ministry Project on the well-being of clergy and clergy families; and Christopher Coble, Program Director in the Religion Division of the Lilly Endowment Inc.

Participants included faculty, deans and presidents from Brite Divinity School, Christian Theological Seminary, Disciples Divinity House at the University of Chicago, Disciples Seminary Foundation, Disciples Divinity House at Vanderbilt University, Lexington Theological Seminary, Phillips Theological Seminary, and representatives from Higher Education Leadership Ministries, and the College of Regional Ministers.

“We are grateful for the leadership of HELM in its work with the Council and for the support and vision of the Pension Fund in hosting this gathering,” said Dr. Gillett.

The conference planning team included LTS Mentor Program Coordinator Jan Ehrmantraut, T. Eugene Fisher of the Pension Fund, Dennis Landon of Higher Education Leadership Ministries, Gillett, Hamlett and Spleth.

 

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Lexington Theological Seminary is an accredited graduate theological institution of the Christian Church (Disciples of Christ).  Consistent with the Disciples’ historic commitment to Christian unity, the Seminary is intentionally ecumenical with students, faculty, staff and trustees of various denominations. The Seminary has been preparing leaders for the church since 1865. For more information, visit www.lextheo.edu.

The Flourishing in Ministry Project focuses on well-being among clergy and their families by studying the characteristics and influences of pastoral well-being over a lifetime. Data for the Christian Church (Disciples of Christ) was gathered in partnership with the Pension Fund of the Christian Church and the Ministry Life Choices Initiative at Lexington Theological Seminary and the Christian Church in Indiana.

The Pension Fund serves the church by supporting ministers, missionaries and lay employees of the Christian Church (Disciples of Christ) and related Campbell-Stone traditions. For over 100 years, first as the Board of Ministerial Relief and then as the administrator of the Pension Plan, it has sought to support the church and its ministry.