Emily Askew

Assistant Professor of Systematic Theologyemily askew Emily Askew

A.B., Smith College, 1983
M.A., University of Northern Iowa, 1991
Ph.D., Vanderbilt University, 2004

Joined faculty in 2007

Dr. Askew is a native Midwesterner but has lived in the north, south, east and west of the US, as well as Germany. She earned her Bachelor of Arts degree in Philosophy from Smith College in 1983, graduating cum laude. She received the Master of Arts degree from the University of Northern Iowa in 1991 with a specialty in Mental Health Counseling. After working as a mental health professional for several years, Dr. Askew was captivated by the theological dimensions of the human experience and returned to school, receiving her Ph.D. in theology from Vanderbilt University in 2004.

A theme that features prominently in Dr. Askew’s work is the ways in which theology informs and is informed by, other disciplines. Her dissertation, “Toward a Just Landscape: The Possibilities of Theology and Place Studies” takes seriously the ways cultural geography contributes to our notions about the nature of God. Her current research and writing projects put theology in conversation with such fields as economics, gender studies, environmental studies and politics. She routinely teaches courses that explore the theological warrants supporting positions on immigration, the environment and sexuality.

Before moving to Lexington, Dr. Askew taught at Carroll College in Waukesha, Wisconsin and served as an instructor at Vanderbilt Divinity School in Nashville, Tennessee. She has been a regular instructor in Adult Education at a variety of churches and faith groups around southeastern Wisconsin and has been an active member of Taize worship communities.

As a Fulbright scholar, in the summer of 2006, she studied the challenges of Muslim immigration in France and Germany.

She is a member of the American Academy and an editor for The Religious Studies Review.

Dr. Askew enjoys playing the violin for Taize worship experiences, hiking and mountain-climbing.